Dear John and the Lab Machines 'Rubicon part 2'
Originality70
Lyrical Content89
Longevity73
Overall Impact68
Reader Rating44 Votes83
75
In spite of being more stripped-down compared to his predecessor, the down-to-earth turmoil still reaches fascinating realms of possibilities for this southamerican youngie porteño, whose search will hopefully rendered with more daring options in the future.

The die is cast is a famous quote following the even more popular crossing the Rubicon. An expression that travelled through the time miles to inspire the Buenos Aires-based artist Dear John and the Lab machine to grab this meaningful metaphor to state his music manifesto. A minimal transition of innocuous indie landscapes and spiritual insights about the peripatetic nature of life. A conceptual collection of thoughts and heedful introspections following up the 2018 previous chapter, still called Rubicon.

Desisting from yawping, the Ep Rubicon 2 has stix songs and peeked number one tune in Argentina, native country of the singer, enveloped in a circuitry of spring reverbs rhyming with the precariousness  of life. An adventure blooming with The light, a morning track which reflects on the spiraling cycle of routine actions counterbalanced by the lustrous power of dreams (I keep on keeping the light on, He sings).

After breaking the ice, Yearning whimsically focuses on a mechanic-generated voice repeating my heart is your name countless times. It rumbles about vitriolic longing and the sensitivity of being exposed to everyday indelicacy.

Huracàn grounds the spiritual declinations animating the author’s restless spirit: It would be better if an hurricane took me away from here, repeats in the refrain. The sinuous spinning in the air is animated with interesting chorus, traditionally oriented to  bands like Miss Caffeina or close enough to talented songwriters like Abdul & The Coffee Theory, Sam Smith, James Arthur.

Agua carries a writhled lyrics wisely conceived and unwieldy expressed. I’m the voice echoing from the bottom and sinks all the ships/ the epicenter of hurricanes in an abandoned triangle/the wave awaiting us/ a sentinel above the lighthouse.

The quiver of emotion is actually a puddle of sun even when it’d like to reincarnate in troublesome scenarios. In this sense, the Rubicon anthology had a bony clock of electronic pushes, something hereby more diluted, more tenuous, more gentle, nevertheless never sitting on the fence. There is no place to be a windwill, afterall, as He goes about in Superman.

In spite of being more stripped-down compared to his predecessor, the down-to-earth turmoil still reaches fascinating realms of possibilities for this southamerican youngie  porteño, whose search will hopefully rendered with more daring options in the future.

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