Arliston return with their first single of 2020 which was written while on tour in Canada. The song had the working title of ‘Stranger Things’ until the last days of mixing, as the hazy, crepuscular riff that the song is built around possesses an inescapable 80’s nostalgia. The clean minimal choruses are balanced beautifully between the chaotic downbeat of the verse, creating something unusual but brilliantly compelling.

Over the years, Arliston have had continued support from the likes of BBC Radio 1, Clash, KALTBLUT, Amazing Radio, Radio X, The 405 and Resonance FM who have championed the distinctive dark-wave sound with comparisons made with The National and Bon Iver. Alongside top engineer, Darren Jones and long-time collaborator Danny Monk, ‘South’ keeps to Arliston’s melancholy style with its clean reverb guitar line, effortless vocals and crisp drumbeat.

This meaning of the newest single ‘South’ centres around the question – At what point is there too much layered scar tissue to keep moving forwards in a relationship? Lots of little individually insignificant actions, adding up to total catastrophe.

“It’s a melancholy boiling pot, one reminiscent of Editors meets The National with a dash of something more contemporary thrown in for good measure.” – One Stop Record Shop

The video shows a couple taking turns alternately damaging, then repairing a hapless vehicle. The damage: reckless and permanent, and the repair: inadequate and makeshift. Continuing, until the car is a visible wreck. Driving forward seems like a constructive step, but the vehicle, the relationship, the thing they’re both sitting in has sustained too much damage, so crashes spectacularly and terminally. Any one of these things in isolation could have been absorbed or tolerated, but when they occur with the memory of previous transgressions raging away in the background it becomes too much. Everything goes ‘South’.

South – The Anatomy of a Car-Crash

Each time Arliston release a song, it seems on foot gets planted deeper in the ambient, dark-indie sensibility they have become known for, while the other finds ever new ground to mix their growing palate with. This time referencing the mainstream-pop world with a nod to the powerfully minimal bass drops in Billie Ellish’s ‘When the Party’s Over’. Look out for new material and shows coming soon in 2020.

https://www.arliston.com/

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